In 2002, staff, students and administrators at Mount Royal Collegiate in Saskatoon began to address violence, intimidation and bullying that had escalated to the point that it was affecting everyone. Attendance, academic performance, school dropout, and the school culture had been negatively impacted. School suspensions were not effective, and it was time to find a proactive approach that would benefit the 1,600 students, staff and surrounding community.
A team of educators, administrators, students and community members designed a Restorative Justice Program and sought funding to have a full-time Restorative Justice Facilitator at Mount Royal. After being turned down by several funding agencies, Mount Royal Collegiate found the support they needed.
 
In 2002, staff, students and administrators at Mount Royal Collegiate in Saskatoon began to address violence, intimidation and bullying that had escalated to the point that it was affecting everyone. Attendance, academic performance, school dropout, and the school culture had been negatively impacted. School suspensions were not effective, and it was time to find a proactive approach that would benefit the 1,600 students, staff and surrounding community.
 
A three-year Restorative Justice Pilot Program was launched at Mount Royal Collegiate in 2003. The program was funded by the Rotary Club of Saskatoon, Saskatoon Public Schools and the Saskatchewan Community Initiatives Fund. Initially, the program’s aim was to reduce violence and bullying while developing a positive school culture and strategies to address issues that stood in the way of students being successful in school.
 
Within months, the program committee realized that addressing conflict was not enough. There needed to be strategies to prevent conflict and help disengaged students reconnect with the school and their social network. The program developed and expanded on an ongoing basis, and became known as RAP (Restorative Action Program) in 2006. At the end of the three-year pilot, Mount Royal Collegiate knew that having a full-time RAP facilitator was essential. Anecdotal and statistical information showed that the program was reducing violence, resolving conflicts, teaching leadership, life skills and helping all youth become good citizens of our community.
 
Today RAP is operating in nine high schools throughout Saskatoon. RAP is supported by all five of Saskatoon’s Rotary Clubs:  Saskatoon Rotary, Nutana Rotary, North Rotary, Meewasin Rotary and Riverside Rotary. These clubs contribute financially and have representatives who are Board members and serve on the Executive Committee of RAP.